Stephen Murray as a Human Being

The name Stephen Murray is always associated with CCMP Capital, but have you ever wondered why it isn’t associated with his philanthropic efforts? Generally, anyone that has worked in the field of finance gets more recognition for what they do with their business rather than what they do as a person.

Murray’s career began in the early 80’s, but that didn’t prevent him from doing great things outside of his career. Ambitious and ready to succeed, Murray was the favorite for many equity investment firms, but being a favorite in this aspect of his life didn’t cause him to become prideful.  Learn more about Stephen Murray CCMP Capital: http://fortune.com/2015/03/13/ex-ccmp-capital-ceo-steve-murray-passes-away/ and http://patch.com/connecticut/stamford/stephen-p-murray-52-financial-executive-stamford-resident-vice-chair-boston-college-board-trustees

Having worked with many companies over time, Murray was also involved in working with many different charitable organizations as well. Some of these included Make A Wish Foundation, Boston College, The Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County, Stamford Museum, and the prestigious Columbia Business School.

One of the most important positions he would ever hold for a good cause was to become the Vice Chairman as the board of trustees for Boston College. As a member of the chairman’s council of Make-A-Wish Foundation, Stephen Murray would be able to impact others dramatically.

While there isn’t much known about Murray’s early life, it’s safe to say that most of his experience working in the world of equity investments and being a credit analyst prepared him for helping any charitable organization see where their biggest need was and how they could fill it. Murray was insistent on finding ways to give back using his vast knowledge and his skills.

Stephen Murray may have focused on learning how to help others invest their money, but clearly he believed it was wise to invest in the person.

Click the links below to read more:

CCMP’s Murray dead at 52
This Old Thing? Private Equity Honcho Drops Little Place Uptown for $11M